Documentary Sounds Alarm to Save Austraila’s Disappearing Black Cockatoo

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The extinction of our many bird species is at an unprecedented threat level. Species already lost in the wild include Brazil’s magnificent Spix’s macaw, the Guam kingfisher, the Socorro dove, the Hawaiian crow, and many others. More than those are limited to just a dreadful few. Of course, science is always hard at work in efforts to prevent the loss of the birds (and other things) in the wild, but as things go with the decimation of habitats, poaching, and invasive predation that wipes out levels of threatened birds, time is at an essence. In recent years, the threat of the loss of the Baudin’s black cockatoo found in Western Australia has increased exponentially.

Currently, their fragile status is that of Critically Endangered. These beautiful black cockatoos number approximately around 10,000 left. Unfortunately, those numbers are declining ever faster as their once reliable habitats turn into fields for pear and apple growers. What amplifies this reduction is farmers shooting the birds on sight as they attempt to eat the fruits being grown. Frighteningly, the current estimation is a complete disappearance in around 20 years if action is not taken.

An Impactful Documentary

trailer image for the documentary, "Black Cockatoo Crisis"
Click image to watch the trailer for “Black Cockatoo Crisis”

Filmmaker Jane Hammond decided to take things into her own hands in a concerted effort to turn around the loss of the bird. She created a documentary entitled “Black Cockatoo Crisis.” With a run time of around 75 minutes, the film details the points that lead to the bird’s losses and how residents of the country of Australia could help. Those depicted in the film are given platform recognition that will serve to bring more attention to the invaluable work that they do. In short, the film is meant to move the audience and encourage more grassroots activists to help combat the loss of the beloved parrot.

The funds needed to create the essential documentary were raised in a Kickstarter-like fashion. It generated the necessary monies required to produce the feature film. The impactful film has already won awards including a Brian Beaton Award for Social Impact. Jane Hammond’s previous documentary helped to raise awareness of disappearing forests by the logging industry. As a result of the film, the logging of precious forestry will experience the cessation of the practice by the end of 2024, reinforced by federal legislation.

“Black Cockatoo Crisis” is being shown within Australia in schools and theatres for free, with donations requested to go toward helping activism to protect the disappearing black cockatoo. Hammond’s Twitter account helps bring even more awareness of destructive projects that threaten to lead the black cockatoo toward oblivion.

Check out the associated (and important)  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube accounts for Jane Hammond and the “Black Cockatoo Crisis” film, as well as other activists. You can view the emotional official trailer for Black Cockatoo Crisis here, but be sure to pull out a few tissues first.

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